The Biggest NBA Draft Busts By Decades: TOP 25 NBA Busts Of The 2000s!

The Biggest NBA Draft Busts By Decades: TOP 25 NBA Busts Of The 2000s!


The 2019 NBA Draft is just hours away. On June 20th, 2019 a crop of new and talented
players will find a new home. But as you know it’s not always fine and
dandy. If you’ve been following me you know I’ve
been making my lists of biggest draft busts by the decades. We’re already gone through the 20th century:
specifically the 60s, 70s, 80s and the 90s and since the draft is so close, I thought
this was a great time to do such video again. Hey guys. Hope you are doing well. PRPLPRNCH here and this time I want you to
watch the biggest draft busts of the 2000s. Let me say first that there were a LOT of
them so as I am in a good mood, heck, in a hard working mood I’ll give you not just
the TOP 10, but the TOP25 NBA Draft Busts of the 2000s. There’s a lot of players so let’s start. Number 1. Stromile Swift – 2nd pick of the 2000 NBA
Draft The 6 foot 10 power forward/center was such
an exciting prospect. He was labelled the next Shawn Kemp and maybe
he was supposed to be. It’s just that he wasn’t. His college career wasn’t that great as
well. 2 years in Louisiana State University and
averages of only 13.4 points and 7 rebounds. That wouldn’t scream to me that he’s a
can’t miss prospect, but it was enough for the Vancouver Grizzlies who drafted him with
the 2nd pick of the 2000 NBA Draft such confirming that they are the worst organization there
ever was. In his rookie season Swift averaged only 4.9
points and 3.6 rebounds and his best season ever was his second season in the NBA when
he averaged 11.8 points and 6.3 rebounds. He never carved a starter role which for the
2nd pick is unacceptable, but he did spend 10 seasons in the NBA, somehow. His career averages though – 19.8 MPG, 8.4
PPG, 4.6 RPG, 21.3 WS 2nd pick worthy? I think not. Number 2. Darius Miles – 3rd pick of the 2000 NBA Draft We stay in the 2000 NBA Draft and we will
for a while because it just was that bad. Just a pick after Stromile Swift, the Los
Angeles Clippers chose Darius Miles with the 3rd pick. At the time he was the highest drafted player
ever right from the high school. He was talented, really talented. In his rookie season he averaged 9.4 points
and 5.9 rebounds. Soon after all the problems started. He wasn’t willing to work, he was labeled
as cocky and lazy and pretty much thought of himself as the second coming of Jesus. That didn’t bode well with the league. He had problems with coaches, management,
threw out racial slurs and was just an accident waiting to happen. He enjoyed his best season with Portland Trail
Blazers in 2006 when he averaged 14 points and 4.6 rebounds, but he also injured his
knee, missed the next two seasons and ultimately wasn’t worth the trouble anymore. He played in the league for 7 seasons and
collected averages of – 26.3 MPG, 10.1 PPG, 4.9 RPG, 9.5 WS
Not good enough for the 3rd pick. Number 3. Marcus Fizer – 4th pick of the 2000 NBA Draft Marcus Fizer had an impressive college career. In 3 years of Iowa State he averaged
18.9 points and 7.4 rebounds. He was especially good in his last college
season when he averaged 22.8 points and 7.7 rebounds. Chicago Bulls already had a power forward
in Elton Brand, but they decided to use their 4th pick to draft another power forward in
Marcus Fizer. His rookie season was OK, as he averaged 9.5
points and 4.3 rebounds and made the 2001 All-Rookie team, but after that it was a bunch
of nothing. He never developed into a full time starter
and in his best season he averaged just 12.3 points and 5.6 rebounds. In total he had just a 6-year NBA career before
he went overseas to play basketball somewhere else. His NBA Career averages: 20.9 MPG, 9.6 PPG,
4.6 RPG, 2.7 WS. Disappointing. Number 4. DerMarr Johnson – 6th pick of the 2000 NBA
Draft The last disappointment of the 2000 NBA Draft
on this list is DerMarr Johnson. A High School All-American and Player of the
year played just one year for the University of Cincinnati before going pro. In that one year he averaged 12.6 points and
3.6 rebounds so Atlanta Hawks picked him up with the 6th
pick of the 2000 NBA Draft and had to regret that almost right away. The 6.9 guard just wasn’t that good to begin
with. In his rookie season he averaged just 5.1
points and 2.8 rebounds and in his second and last season with Atlanta he set up what
would be his career best season of 8.4 points and 3.4 rebounds per game. He missed a season because of a neck injury
and never reached that level again. He played for 3 more teams, but never developed
into anything more than just 15 minutes per game type of player. He was battling with some injuries but even
when he was healthy he just wasn’t a player everyone thought of him before the draft. Just 7 seasons in the NBA and averages of
17.2 MPG, 6.2 PPG, 2.2 RPG, 6.4 WS. Disappointing. Number 5. Kwame Brown – 1st pick of the 2001 NBA Draft Probably the best known player on this list
and also the one who had a pretty long career was Kwame Brown. In high school he was good. In his senior year he averaged 20.1 points,
13.3 rebounds and 5.8 blocks. He was drafted Number 1 by the Washington
Wizards because at the time it was cool to draft a big body. In his rookie season Kwame disappointed big
time as he was able to average just 4.5 points and 3.5 rebounds. And his shot blocking was non-existent. It just vanished. He spent 4 years in Washington and had only
one double digit point season in 2003-2004 which was actually the best season of his
career as he also averaged 7.4 rebounds. Lakers picked him up but soon realized that
he can’t play and traded him to Memphis in the heist of the century. He bounced around the league all the way till
2013 when he was last seen with the Philadelphia 76ers. In total, as the first draft pick he was nothing
more than a backup center who averaged just 22.1 MPG, 6.6 PPG, 5.5 RPG, 20.8 WS for his
12-year career. One of the biggest busts ever. Number 6. Eddy Curry – 4th pick of the 2001 NBA Draft Another darling of the 2001 NBA Draft was
Eddy Curry. Similarly to Kwame Brown he posted great numbers
in high school. In his senior year Curry posted a year statline
of 22 points, 9 rebounds and 6 blocks. Add that to his 7 foot length and his size
and skill was too much to be ignored. This time, the luck struck out on the Chicago
Bulls who drafted Curry with the 4th pick. In his rookie season Curry was a bit underwhelming
averaging only 6.7 points and 3.8 rebounds per game. In 4 total seasons with the Chicago Bulls,
Curry averaged 11.8 points and 4.9 rebounds. A solid statline for a backup center, but
not the starting center Curry was supposed to be and was. He improved under the New York Knicks uniform
where he averaged 15.2 points and 5.8 rebounds but a lot of those stats were padded considering
he was on a bad Knicks team. He did have 2 more short stints with Miami
and Dallas but ultimately didn’t realize the potential he once had. A lot of that self-inflicted. Sure, he did have many injuries and health
issues, but at least some of that was due to the fact that he never really cared enough
to get himself in a good shape. His career stats: 24.9 MPG, 12.9 PPG, 5.2
RPG, 21.7 WS Number 7. DeSagana Diop – 8th pick of the 2001 NBA Draft And yet another big man bust from the 2001
NBA Draft. This time it’s DeSagana Diop. Another high school standout with averages
of 14.6 points, 13.2 rebounds and 8.1 blocks in his senior season. Diop was appealing enough for the Cleveland
Cavaliers to draft him with the 8th pick. He didn’t have the expectations of Brown
and Curry, but still, he was supposed to be much more than he was. In 4 seasons with Cleveland he started only
5 games and averaged 1.6 points and 2.6 rebounds. His gaudy block numbers from high school dropped
to just 0.9 blocks per game in Cleveland. After Cleveland he joined the Dallas Mavericks
where he enjoyed his best 2 and a half seasons averaging 2.4 points and 4.8 rebounds. He also had stints in New Jersey, back in
Dallas and Charlotte but nothing impressive about those ones either. In total he spent 12 years in the league and
posted career numbers of 14 MPG, 2 PPG, 3.7 RPG, 12.8 WS. He has found his way on Utah Jazz coaching
staff so maybe he does better as a coach. Number 8. Jay Williams – 2nd pick of the 2002 NBA Draft Jay Williams proved and polished his basketball
talent for 3 years in Duke where he averaged 19.3 points and 6 assists. He was a good shooter, played some D so the Chicago Bulls thought hey, this looks
good and drafted him with the 2nd pick of the 2002 NBA Draft. His career was short though. He did have a promising rookie season averaging
9.5 points and 4.7 assists with acceptable shooting splits for a rookie. But then he literally crashed himself out
of the league. He got himself into a motorcycle accident
on June 19th, 2003. He wasn’t wearing a helmet, got himself
seriously injured and also released because he violated Bulls policy of not riding a motorcycle. He never got back to the league and now works
as an analyst for ESPN. Very happy that he has gotten his life together,
but his career stats as the 2nd pick are disappointing – just 75 games played and averages of 26.1
MPG, 9.5 PPG, 4.7 APG, 0.8 WS Number 9. Nikoloz Tskitishvilli – 5th pick of the 2002
NBA Draft And with the Number 5 pick of the 2002 NBA
Draft the Denver Nuggets select Nikoloz Tskitishvilli. That was probably the last time you heard
his name. Why he got drafted so high is beyond me. Before the draft he played in Europe for 13
games and averaged 6.6 points per game. Did those gaudy numbers trigger Denver? Who knows. But in the NBA he was a no show. His best season was his first when he averaged
3.9 points and 2.2 rebounds. Awesome indeed. He spent just 4 seasons in the NBA in total,
never even coming close to his rookie numbers, but he is still playing all around the world. As recent as 2019 he played for Beirut Club
wherever that is. In NBA however he has career averages of 11.3
MPG, 2.9 PPG, 1.8 RPG, -1.6 WS. Number 10. DaJuan Wagner – 6th pick of the 2002 NBA Draft DaJuan Wagner was mostly known to the NBA
teams as that kid who scored 100 points in a high school game. Even though it is just high school it’s
still very impressive. In University of Memphis he didn’t score
a 100 points, but he still averaged a cool 21.2 points per game. Hello Cleveland! They drafted him with the 6th pick of the
2002 NBA Draft. Things didn’t look so bad in his rookie
season as he averaged 13.4 points and 2.8 assists, but it all went down from there. Various injuries, lack of consistency – all
contributed to 3 more bad NBA seasons – 2 with Cleveland and 1 with the Warriors. In total, 4 years in the league and averages
of 21.4 MPG, 9.4 PPG, 1.9 APG, 0WS which means
he pretty much added nothing to the team. Number 11. Darko Milicic – 2nd pick of the 2003 NBA Draft The 2003 NBA Draft is widely regarded as one
of the best drafts ever. After all it gave us Lebron James, Dwyane
Wade, Carmelo Anthony, Chris Bosh and believe it or not Darko Milicic who was drafted with
the 2nd pick. Detroit hoped that the 7 foot European with
a labelled soft touch would help them to win the NBA Championship and in theory he did. The Pistons won the 2004 championship, but
not because of Darko. In his rookie season he averaged only 1.4
points and 1.3 rebounds. His most impressive season up to that point
happened in 2008 as a part of the Memphis Grizzlies team when he averaged 7.2 points
and 6.1 rebounds. After that he had a couple of good seasons
for the Timberwolves where he averaged 8.8 and 8.3 points, but nothing more. He was out of the NBA at just 27 years old
and hasn’t played since 2012-2013 season where he played 1 game. His career averages: 18.5 MPG, 6 PPG, 4.2
RPG, 7.1 WS He tried to pursue a kickboxing career but
failed and now works as a farmer. A big bust indeed. Number 12. Michael Sweetney – 9th pick of the 2003 NBA
Draft In 3 years of Georgetown Michael Sweetney
impressed with his scoring touch and rebounding ability. For such a big guy he was somewhat undersized
only at 6 foot 8, but that didn’t stop him from producing. For his college career Sweetney averaged 18.2
points and 9.2 rebounds. In the NBA however everything wasn’t as
smooth. He got drafted pretty high, with the 9th pick
by the New York Knicks, but in New York he wasn’t able to replicate even a half of
his production in college. In his rookie season he averaged only 4.3
points and 3.7 rebounds. In his second year, he improved slightly to
8.4 points and 5.4 rebounds, but not enough for the Knicks to keep him. he was traded to the Chicago Bulls for Eddy
Curry and in Chicago he had 2 underwhelming seasons averaging only 6 points and 4.1 rebounds. He struggled with weight, that impacted his
health and performance and in the end he had only a 4-year NBA career with averages of
15.5 MPG, 6.5 PPG, 4.5 RPG, 7.8 WS Number 13. Shaun Livingston – 4th pick of the 2004 NBA
Draft It almost hurts to put Shaun Livingston on
this list because of all his contributions to 3 Warriors championships. No he wasn’t the catalyst of all the success
but he was a damn big part of it. The problem is that considering when he was
drafted he should be considered a bust. A lot of colleges wanted Livingston as he
was considered a five star recruit, but he opted to jump to the NBA straight out of high
school. Livingston was drafted in the 2004 NBA Draft
with the 4th pick by the Clippers and ended up playing just 30 games in his first season
averaging 7.4 points and 5 assists. At 6 foot 7 he was a pretty tall point guard
who could shoot, defend and set up offense. Unfortunately, he never developed into a five
star recruit he was supposed to be. He never averaged double digit points in the
NBA and a lot of that was because of his catastrophic knee problems. Like I said it hurts to put him on this list,
but I’m glad he was able to carve out a pretty long career for himself even with all
the injuries that cost him his prime. For his NBA career, Shaun Livingston carries
averages of 6.3 PPG, 3 APG, 29.9 WS. Not worthy of the 4th pick unfortunately. Number 14. Rafael Araujo – 8th pick of the 2004 NBA Draft Another big man bust from the 2000s is Rafael
Araujo who was expected to be a great complimentary piece to Chris Bosh in the Toronto Raptors. Drafted with the 8th pick, it was expected
that Rafael would show some of his skills from college where in 2 years he averaged
15.1 points and 9.5 rebounds. Instead what Toronto got was an unready player. He spent just 2 years in Toronto and was able
to average only 2.9 points and 3 rebounds. Utah Jazz tried to revive his career for a
year, but all they got was 2.6 points and 2.4 rebounds. His NBA career was over after only three seasons
and averages of 11.4 MPG, 2.8 PPG, 2.8 RPG, -0.4 WS Number 15. Andrea Bargnani – 1st pick of the 2006 NBA
Draft Now, I was hesitant to put him on this list,
just because there were so many players I already had to cover, but since this list
is so big you just can’t make your 2000s draft bust list without Andrea Bargnani, you
just can’t. Before the NBA draft he already had a 4 year
professional career in Europe, he was one of Euro Leagues best young players and was
named the rising star of Euro League. All that plus his ball handling skills, shooting
touch and length and comparison to Dirk Nowitzki prompted the Toronto Raptors to draft him
with the 1st pick of the 2006 NBA Draft. What they got was a scorer, with a slightly
worse shooting than advertised and absolutely nothing else. No defense, almost no rebounding and I guess
no winner gene as well. He did have some successful seasons like in
2011 when he averaged 21.4 points and 5.2 rebounds for the Raptors, but overall he couldn’t
offer anything besides some points, and when he started to get injured a lot, well, that
was just the end. In total Bargnani spent 10 seasons in the
NBA and carries averages of 28.7 MPG, 14.3 PPG, 4.6 RPG, 18.9 WS. Sure, the stats aren’t that bad when you
compare them to other people on this list, but they’re not great either. Hey, on a positive note, he isn’t the worst
ever. Number 16. Adam Morrison – 3rd pick of the 2006 NBA Draft Michael Jordan’s first pick ever was Adam
Morrison. Oh geez. Morrison was good in college averaging 19.7
points and 5.1 rebounds and he was especially impressive in his last year of college when
he averaged 28.1 points and 5.5 rebounds. Now that’s a talent you just cant let slip
by. Or at least that’s what Jordan thought. In his rookie season Morrison averaged 11.8
points and 2.9 rebounds and made the All-Rookie team, but then had to sit out a season because
of a knee injury. He never was the same. He spent 2 more seasons in the NBA, a half
season with Charlotte and one a half with the Lakers. He ended his NBA Career winning the NBA Championship
with the Lakers in 2010. Champion he is, but are the career numbers
of 20.4 MPG, 7.5 PPG, 2.1 RPG, -1.4 WS champion worthy? Those are bust worthy. Number 17. Tyrus Thomas – 4th pick of the 2006 NBA Draft Oh my, the 2006 NBA Draft was so bad. Almost as bad as the 4th pick Tyrus Thomas. After averaging 12.3 points and 9.2 rebounds
in one year at the Louisiana State I guess Tyrus Thomas was seen as this great talent
who would bloom in the NBA. I mean, you can’t really blame the Portland
Trail Blazers for drafting him with the 4th pick But you can blame the Chicago Bulls for
trading for Tyrus Thomas and giving away Lamarcus Aldridge in return. In Chicago Tyrus Thomas bloomed into a player
who in his best season averaged 10.8 points and 6.4 rebounds. After a trade to Charlotte Thomas descended
into a player who averaged 10.1 points and 5.5 rebounds and after that well, there was
just 2 games for the Grizzlies. He wasn’t that good to begin with. He was a solid rotation player who could give
you something, but you usually don’t look for those with your 4th pick. For his NBA Career Tyrus Thomas averaged 19.7
MPG, 7.7 PPG, 4.8 RPG, 13 WS Number 18. Shelden Williams – 5th pick of the 2006 NBA
Draft The 6 foot 9 forward spent 4 years in Duke
and had some great years there. He averaged a double double in his last 2
college seasons and in his senior year averaged 18. 8 points and 10.7 rebounds. For his whole college career he carried averages
of 13.9 points and 9.1 rebounds and it was enough to be drafted with the 5th pick by
the Atlanta Hawks. In the NBA though, he didn’t feel that imposing. He started on the wrong note by averaging
only 5.5 points and 5.4 rebounds in his rookie season and that actually was his best season
as a pro. He bounced around the league because nobody
really wanted to commit to him. He just wasn’t that good. He never again averaged even 5 points per
season which just gives us a logical conclusion that he’s a bust. He played for 7 NBA Teams and spent a total
of just 6 seasons in the league. Career averages of 15.5 MPG, 4.5 PPG, 4.3
RPG, 9.9WS speak for themselves. On a positive note, he was married to another
beautiful basketball player Candace Parker and she was much better than her husband at
basketball. Number 19. Patrick O Bryant – 9th pick of the 2006 NBA
Draft The Notorious P.O.B. Such a cool nickname for a basketball player
that spent just 3 years in the NBA. 11.6 points and 7.8 rebounds in 2 years of Bradley. Nothing to sneeze at, but nothing special. Drafted with the 9th pick of the atrocious
2006 NBA Draft by the Golden State Warriors. In his best season averaged 4.7 points and
2.5 rebounds for the Toronto Raptors. For his career averaged 5.8 MPG, 2.1 PPG,
1.4 RPG, 0.5 WS. Enough said. Let’s just move on. Number 20. Greg Oden – 1st pick of the 2007 NBA Draft This one hurts too because Greg Oden never
should have been a bust. He never actually was. He was very good when he was on the court. The sad truth is, that he almost never was
on the court. His chronic knee problems were painful to
watch and read about. In his only college season at Ohio State Oden
averaged 15.7 points and 9.6 rebounds and since Portland needed a big guy, they drafted
a big guy over Kevin Durant who already has established himself as an all-time great. Perhaps, Portland should’ve remembered what
happened the last time they drafted a big time center with injury concerns when they
were looking for one like 20 something years ago in Sam Bowie. Oden missed his rookie season. Had a relatively healthy first season in the
league by playing 61 games and in just 21.5 minutes per game he posted a statline of 8.9
points and 7 rebounds. That was his peak. Next year he played in just 21 games before
suffering injury again. Then he had a bunch of setbacks and missed
3 years of basketball. he did try a comeback for the Miami Heat in
2014, but he just wasn’t able to really perform because of all the knee problems. In total, he just played in 105 NBA games
and carries career averages of 19.3 MPG, 8 PPG, 6.2 RPG, 7.3WS. Injuries suck, but since he was the 1st pick
you have to take that into account and call him a bust. Number 21. Yi Jianlian – 6th pick of the 2007 NBA Draft You know what happens when you have a bigger
than life figure in the NBA from a foreign country that hasn’t yet been known producing
basketball players, yet somehow that guy, even when injury prone, was successful in
his short time in the league? As a draft guy, you assume, that this is it,
the talent pool is open and we have another talent from China coming in. A can’t miss talent. I’m of course talking bout Yao Ming’s
success in the NBA and the hype that was put around Yi Jianlian, let’s be honest, just
because he was from the same country as Yao Ming. Yi Jianlian was never Yao, he was never supposed
to be. He was rated too high by everyone and busted
in the NBA. The 7 feet tall chairman was drafted by the
Milwaukee Bucks had an ok rookie season averaging 8.6 points and 5.2 rebounds. And after Milwaukee saw that he’s no Yao
Ming, they gave him to New Jersey. There he had a semi successful season averaging
12 points and 7.2 rebounds. 1 more season in Washington and Dallas and
he was out of the league. And never returned. For his career Yi Jianlian averaged 22.2 MPG,
7.9 PPG, 4.9 RPG, 3.1 WS. Like I said, no Yao Ming. Number 22. Michael Beasley – 2nd pick of the 2008 NBA
Draft Oh, and here we come to Mr. Beasley. a great scoring talent, not a willing defender
who just last year played a bit for the Los Angeles Lakers. Beasley had a fantastic one year of college
in Kansas State where he averaged 26.2 points and 12.4 rebounds. Surely he entered the 2008 NBA Draft with
a lot of hype and was drafted with the 2nd pick by the Miami Heat. He was a solid scorer, he always was, just
not as good against the NBA competition and not as good as advertised. Add in some personal issues, lack of motivation
and you have yourself a guy who scores, but really doesn’t do anything else. Beasley was always a gifted scorer. In 11 NBA season he’s averaged double digit
points in 7 of them and even averaged 19.2 points per game for a whole season in Minnesota,
but that was just so long ago and Beasley probably will be back in the NBA someday as
he is just 30 years old, but I guess the clock has run out on this guy. He just doesn’t have the makeup of a real
NBA star although he had all the talents. Considering what he was supposed to be, his
career averages of 22.8 MPG, 12.4 PPG, 4.7 RPG, 15.6 WS are very
disappointing. Number 23. O.J. Mayo – 3rd pick of the 2008 NBA Draft Another gifted scorer makes the list of the
biggest NBA Draft Busts and it’s O.J. Mayo. After averaging 20.7 points and 4.5 rebounds
in one year at USC O.J. Mayo was considered as the top prospect heading into the 2008
NBA Draft. So thought Minnesota Timberwolves who drafted
him with the third pick, but immediately traded him to the Memphis Grizzlies basically for
Kevin Love. What a good trade that was for the Timberwolves. Memphis however saw how overrated was O.J.
Mayo. He did score for Memphis and did that at a
high level. He averaged 18.5 points, 3.8 rebounds and
3.2 assists as a rookie. It all went down from there though. Each year his scoring averages and shooting
percentages dropped. After 4 years in Memphis he joined Dallas
for a year where he was able to score some ball averaging 15.3 points per game. Then he spent 3 seasons in Milwaukee which
were his last seasons in the league. On July 1st, 2016 Mayo was banned from the
NBA for 2 years for drug violation which just further downspiraled his career and he hasn’t
been back in the NBA since and I doubt he’ll ever be again. So for his career he averaged 30.9 MPG, 13.8
PPG, 3.1 RPG, 21.8 WS Number 24. Hasheem Thabeet – 2nd pick of the 2009 NBA
Draft Whenever a player who is taller than 7 feet
shows up, it always catches eye of some teams. In the case of Hasheem Thabeet, the hype was
a bit warranted. In 3 college seasons at UConn, he averaged
10.3 points, 8.5 rebounds and 4.2 blocks. He was a defensive stopper and a tall one. I guess that’s what the Memphis Grizzlies
needed when they drafted him with the 2nd pick of the 2009 NBA Draft. He flopped right away. He couldn’t even earn playing time on a
bad team. Do I even need to read his statline? I’ll read his rookie numbers – 3.1 points,
3.6 rebounds and 1.3 blocks. He couldn’t top that for the rest of his
career. He’s been bouncing around the league and
has at least dressed for 4 teams. He hasn’t played in the NBA since 2014 and
currently holds career averages of 10.5 MPG, 2.2 PPG, 2.7 RPG, 4.8 WS. Oh where did that talent go? And Number 25. Jonny Flynn – 6th pick of the 2009 NBA Draft A 6 foot tall, quick scorer out of Syracuse
once caught an eye of the Minnesota Timberwolves. In 2 years at Syracuse Jonny Flynn averaged
16.6 points and 6 assists and the Timberwolves needed a point guard so I guess it made some
sense to draft him. Flynn had an OK rookie season averaging 13.5
points and 4.4 assists but everything else from there on was just a misery. His shooting and decision making got worse
and worse and he didn’t have the build to really bang and do something else. Flynn had very short stints in Houston and
Portland, but these 2 teams as well as the Timberwolves themselves couldn’t see a reason
why this guy was drafted Number 6. We might have forgotten about you Jonny, if
a certain all-time great point guard wasn’t drafted right after you. We last saw Jonny Flynn in the NBA almost
8 years ago. Any questions? A bust that holds a career statline of 22.9
MPG, 9.2 PPG, 3.9 APG, -1.1 WS Whew. That was a long video so thanks for watching. Hope you did watch it till the end and enjoyed
it. I know it’s a long one, but hopefully you
were entertained and saw something you liked. Can you add more players to this list of busts? Share your thoughts on the players I mentioned
in the comments. I’ll appreciate that very much. There’s one more bust video coming your
way very soon. Please, like this video and let others see
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