Jeep Wrangler JK 2-Door Teraflex 2.5 in. Sport S/T2 Lift Kit w/ Falcon 2.1 Shocks Review & Install

Jeep Wrangler JK 2-Door Teraflex 2.5 in. Sport S/T2 Lift Kit w/ Falcon 2.1 Shocks Review & Install


Hey, guys. Today I’m here with the TeraFlex 2-and-a-half-inch
S/T2 suspension lift kit with 2.1 Falcon monotube shocks fitting all 2007 to 2018 2-door JK
Wranglers. So, when you’re upgrading your suspension
and adding a lift to your Wrangler, it can add a number of different benefits, including
trail performance, street comfortability, and street ride quality, as well as this overall
aesthetics to your Wrangler. So, this optimized TeraFlex is gonna be for
that Wrangler owner who’s looking to do all of that. This is going to be named the ST, which means
street and trail. So, this is going to be perfectly tuned for
that street ride and that ride quality, as well as the trail performance that you’re
getting out of this lift kit. So, not only are you getting a perfect split
between a trail and street performance, but you’re also getting that mild two and a half
inches of lift, which is gonna open up a lot of room in the wheel well for larger wheels
and tires, better articulation off-road. What it’s also going to do is level out the
rake in the hood and overall create a more aggressive stance with your Wrangler. Now, like I said, this is going to be a high-quality
lift kit, so this is perfect for somebody who’s looking for an all-inclusive lift kit
that comes with everything that you need in order to install this on your Wrangler. So, you are getting a lot of high-quality
components with this. You are getting the 2.1 Falcon monotube shocks,
which is gonna be a higher performance shock. So, this is perfect for somebody who’s spending
a lot of time on the trail but also wants something that’s going to ride good and have
some good ride quality on the street. Now, what I do really like about this is that
it comes with everything that you need to accommodate for that extra two and a half
inches of lift that you’re putting on your Wrangler, so you’re getting front lower control
arms, you are getting an adjustable track bar, which a lot of lift kits don’t come with
and you’re getting all the brackets to extend your brake lines and even the track bar in
the back. So, like I said, this is a very inclusive
lift kit, perfect for somebody who’s looking to invest in their suspension and also wants
to kind of get it done in one shot. So, as far as wheel and tires go, you are
going to add 2 and half inches to your suspension, so you are going to be able to fit comfortably
a 35-inch tire. So, the 35-inch tire is going to fill out
the wheel well really nicely. It’s still gonna leave you a lot of room for
articulation on the trail, which is something that you want. You want a lot of up travel on the trail,
and a 35-inch tire is definitely going to allow it. Now, as for the 33s, they may look a little
bit smaller, but they may fit just right if you are looking for a smaller tire that allows
you a lot more up travel than a 35-inch tire would, and then as for the 37s, you may be
able to fit them on. You may be able to turn the wheel from lock
to lock without any rubbing if you have an aftermarket from bumper. However, these bump stops on this lift kit
or paired with this lift kit are not going to accommodate that extra 2 inches in diameter
for a 37-inch tire, so if you do hit a bump, you may have tire-to-fender contact. So, overall, in my opinion, a 35-inch tire
is going to work perfectly for this lift kit, and it’s going to fit very well paired with
this lift kit. But, like I said, it’s going to include everything
that you need in order to lift your Wrangler and accommodate for all of that extra height
while also adding a lot of performance and a lot of quality parts into the mix of this
lift kit. So, when you’re taking a look at lift kits
all across the board, usually, the price will go up or down depending on what’s included
in the lift kits. So, this one is going to be a higher-priced
option because it really comes with everything that you need. It’s gonna come with high-performance shocks,
front lower control arms. It does have a front adjustable track bar
and all the odds and ends in order to accommodate for that extra two and a half inches. Now, when you’re looking at lower price options,
you’re either gonna be taking a look at options that aren’t gonna give you a full two and
a half inches. They may not come with all the components
that you see in this kit. And then on the other hand, when you take
a look at more expensive lift kits, they are usually going to come with more high-performance
components. You may see piggyback shocks or reservoir
shocks, or you may just see more components included in the lift kit. So, my personal opinion, I think this is a
perfect option for somebody who’s looking to really invest in their suspension system
with a high-quality kit that’s also gonna give them a perfect split between trail and
street performance. So, install is going to be a three-out-of-three
wrenches on the difficulty meter. It is gonna be quite hard to get this on,
and it’ll probably take you about a day to get the job done if you’re doing this in your
driveway. Now, this is going to take a number of different
basic hand tools and also a couple of different specialty tools, but I’ll walk you through
the install. So, speaking of that, let’s jump into that
now. The tools that I used for my install were
a hammer, a small and a large dead blow, a trim removal tool, an air hammer, a pair of
safety glasses, an electric impact, a three-eighths inch drive, and a half-inch drive pneumatic
impact, a drill, a tape measure, a large and small pry bar, a cutoff wheel, a large and
a medium pair of channel locks, a pair of vice grips, pair of snips. You’re gonna need a standard and metrics set
of open-ended or box wrenches as well as ratcheting wrenches, flathead screwdriver, center punch,
the provided tool by TeraFlex, a Phillips head screwdriver, blue Loctite, a set of different
size extensions, a set of Allen sockets or Allen keys, a set of standard and a metric
deep sockets, shallow sockets, as well as impact sockets, a set of metrics swivel sockets,
a step bit, a quarter-inch drive, three-eighths inch drive, and half-inch drive ratchet. So, the first step to this install is getting
the Jeep up in the air and taking the tires off. Now, we are going to be starting in the front,
so if you are on the ground with the jack and jack stands, you’re going to want to take
off those front wheels and tires and jack the rear wheels and tires. Next step is to support our axle now, we are
up on a lift, so I’m going to use pole jacks, but if you are on the ground, you want to
make sure that you are supporting the axle with jack stands or whatever you have. So, I’m gonna be using an 18-millimeter socket
and wrench to take off that first sway bar end link. So, with the passenger sway bar end link,
I am gonna be using a swivel socket just because there’s not a lot of room over here. It’s still gonna be an 18-millimeter, and
I’m going to use the same 18-millimeter wrench. So, what we can do now is fully remove our
sway bar end link using a 19-millimeter open-ended wrench to keep this stud still and that same
18-millimeter socket to take off that nut. So, what we can do now is disconnect the axle
side of our track bar. Now, we are going to be replacing our track
bar, so we are going to do the frame size as well. So, for the axle side, I’m going to be using
a 21-millimeter socket. So, the frame side of our track bar does not
have a flag nut on the other side, so I’m gonna use a 13/16th-inch box wrench to hold
that still while we use our 21-millimeter socket to take that bolt out. And
after that, we can fully remove our track bar. So, what we can do next is remove the lower
shock bolt. I’m going to be using an 18-millimeter swivel
and an 18-millimeter wrench to take that bolt out. Now, you may have to tinker with the axle
height in order to free up that bolt. A little bit of compression on the shock and
it should slide right out. So, our next step is to fully remove our shock. There is gonna be a stud going through the
shock perch here. There is going to be a nut on the other side
that we will have to crack free. So, I’m gonna use a 16-millimeter wrench,
an open-ended wrench to keep the shock body still. There is a captured nut here on the shock
body, and then a 16-millimeter ratcheting wrench for that top nut. Now, I would recommend soaking this in a penetrating
catalyst like PB B’laster or WD-40. These can get very rusty and are susceptible
to breaking. So, first, make sure that you soak it before,
and then we can take off that nut and fully remove our shock. So, after that nut is removed, what we can
do is wiggle out our shock, making sure to get the cup washer and the bushing from the
top of our shock perch. So, after our shock is out, what we can do
since we’re on this side is take our brake line bracket off of our frame and then off
of our spring perch. So, I’m gonna grab a trim removal tool to
remove our breather hose from that bracket just so we can give it some extra slack. We want to make sure that the brake line is
not stressed out once we drop our axle. So then we can take a 10-millimeter socket
and take off this bolt and just unhook that from our frame. That is just going to give us a little bit
of extra slack, and then we can move down to our spring perch and remove that bracket
as well. So, our next step is to totally discard this
bracket. Now, what I’m gonna do is make a notch in
the bracket with my cutoff wheel and then pry it back. TeraFlex recommends that you just pry it back
without making a notch. Now, that is incredibly hard to do because
of the structural integrity of this actual bracket, so making a notch in it makes it
a little bit easier. Now, if you are going to do this step, make
sure you keep the soft line in mind. You cannot nick the soft line, or else you’ll
have to replace it. So, just be very careful. We’re not gonna go all the way through. We are just going to make a little notch on
here and lessen the structural integrity of it. But the first step, we need to get our ABS
line out of the way. So, I’m going to take a trim removal tool
and take these two clips out of the bracket. Now also, if you notice, I’m keeping this
bracket in place up against our shock mount with pair of vice grips. This is just gonna make sure that it’s not
moving around and make sure our cutting is precise. So, I’m just going to pop this line out of
our soft line here, move that out of the way. Then we can grab a pair of safety glasses
and cut off wheel and make a notch in this bracket. So, after we have made a notch, what I’m gonna
do is grab a pair of channel locks and try to pry this open. Now, the actual bracket is gonna want to move,
but it will max out at some point. So, you should be able to wiggle out the brake
line once you’ve pried it back a little. I did put a little bit of PB B’laster in there
just to kind of leave it up to get it out of there. So, after you have pried this completely back
and open it up where you can squeeze your soft line out, I put a little bit of lubricant
in there so we could slide it out, but just wiggle out your soft line and completely discard
this bracket. So, what we can do now is just repeat that
process on the other side. So, this is actually how it should pry back
once you make a notch in the metal. But once that’s out, we can just take this
off, and what we can do now is lower our axle and take out our springs. So, our next step is to remove our staff bump
stop because we will be replacing these with longer bump stops. I did spray a little bit of PB B’laster on
there just to kind of make it a little bit easier to take out the bump stop since they
can be difficult. And I also have a flathead screwdriver because
there are little tabs on the jounce tube, so that is going to lock this in place. It makes it a little bit difficult to take
out. So, we’re gonna try to pry this out and wiggle
it out. So, our next step is gonna be to remove our
control arms. So, these are going to be the lower front
control arms. I’m going to be using a 21-millimeter socket
on the bolt head side and a 13/16th-inch wrench on the nut side. So, we can remove the top part of the mount. Now, be mindful as soon as you loosen this
up, the control arm is going to swing down. I just have it resting on my shoulder here,
and we’re going to use that same 21-millimeter socket and 13/16th-inch wrench. So, now that we have our factory system out
of our Wrangler, I wanted to send it next to our TeraFlex suspension system and show
you guys a little bit of a comparison and what big upgrades that you’re gonna get with
your new TeraFlex system. So, right off the bat, you can tell that this
is overall a big upgrade in performance, just looking at the suspension system sitting on
the table. But it’s also gonna do a really good job at
some restoration and replacing some worn out parts. As you can tell, we have a bunch of rust build-up
on all of our components that we’ve pulled out of a Wrangler already, so this is gonna
do a great job at replacing a lot of those parts. Now, starting off with one of the main components
that’s going to give you a lot of that ride quality and ride feel out of your Wrangler
when you’re driving is going to be your shock. So, there’s really two big schools of thought
when it comes to shocks. You’re gonna have a hydraulic shock, and you’re
going to have a gas charge shock. So, a hydraulic shock is very similar to the
factory. That’s what your factory shock is gonna be. That’s gonna give you a very fluid and very
comfortable ride perfect for the daily driver, but not really good for performance. So, once you start to really hit some harder
trails and work the shock really hard, it is susceptible to shock fade over time, which
is cavitation or foaming forming inside the shock, which leads to shock fade. So, a gas charge shock is going to be a more
high-performance shock, and that’s exactly what this Falcon 2.1 monotube shock is gonna
be. So, that’s going to separate the oil and gas. It’s going to reduce shock fade over time,
making it very durable in the inside of the shock, and it’s gonna give you some high performance,
and that’s going to be a big upgrade over your factory hydraulic shocks. Now, these are also going to be very durable
on the outside as well, and they are going to be made of a 6061-T6 precipitation-hardened
aluminum alloy shock body, and they’re also gonna have a 3/4-inch chrome plated shaft. So, that’s going to prevent any buckling. It is going to do a great job on the trail
if it does take a hit off-road. So, what I do really like about these shocks
is the fact that they are corner specific, and they are perfectly tuned for street and
trail driving. So it is going to be very comfortable even
though it is a high-performance shock that might feel a little bit stiffer. So, moving down the line, another big key
component in this lift kit is gonna be your springs. That’s what’s gonna give you your height out
of this lift kit. So, these are gonna be two and a half inches
taller than your factory springs and are gonna act as a really good replacement to something
that is worn down and rusty like ours that just came out of our Wrangler. So, another big component of this lift kit,
and what I do really like about this lift kit is that it includes the front lower control
arms. So, when you lift your Wrangler, you’re throwing
off a lot of angles. Your axle is actually gonna roll, so your
front lower control arms play a big key of rolling that axle back, and that’s exactly
what TeraFlex is going to include. So, they include pre-adjusted and pre-tuned
front lower control arms, which will even out the playing field for that geometry that
we threw off in the beginning. So, I do really like that those are included
and they’re gonna be a lot stronger than your factory front lower control arms. Now with all of those big key components out
of the way, there are a bunch of little components that play a key role in accommodating for
all of that extra height, so you’re getting longer bump stops, which will prevent any
fender to tire contact, and you’re also getting longer sway bar end links. But what I do really like about the ones that
TeraFlex included is the fact that they do come with quick disconnect hardware. So, if you’re at the trailhead and you need
to disconnect your sway bar end links for immediate articulation, all you have to do
is pull a pin and slide it off and store it away. And it’s just as simple as that. You don’t have to manually get under your
Wrangler and do it. So, that is a big upgrade from our factory
sway bar end links that, as you can tell, are worn out already. So, enough about all of our major key components
on the table right here, let’s go ahead and start our install with our new TeraFlex suspension
system. So, now we can go ahead and install our control
arm using our factory bolts. We’re gonna start up at the top, and we’re
not going to tighten these down. We need to make sure that we get these installed
and tighten them back down on their own weight when the Jeep is on the ground. We’re gonna detach the bolt. That’s the nut, and then we can move down
to the back there. So, now we can attach the bottom of our lower
front control arm. I am gonna have somebody, again, pry on this
with a large pry bar just to move the axle forward so we can attach our bolt. Now that both of those control arms are in,
what we can do next is install our bump stops. So, our next step is to install our bump stops. As you can tell, there are a couple of blocks
of wood here, and that’s going to help us press this in. So, this little collar on here is going to
be tapered. You want to make sure that the bigger end
is at the back and the smaller end, there is gonna be a little notch in the plastic
there, and that’s gonna be facing the front of the Jeep. So, what I’m going to do is position that
in the jounce tube and then just raise up our axle, and it’ll basically just press itself
in, and then making sure that this is as straight as possible. We can just press that in. You’ll see it go in and set in the place. So, after our first attempt, I put a little
bit of grease on there to help work its way into the jounce tube. Hopefully, that will press in a little bit
easier, and it looks like it is already. There we go. It’ll settle right in the place. You’ll hear it set, and then we can just do
the same thing on the other side. So, our next step is to install our bump stop
extension right here. However, we do have to drill a hole in order
to attach this. So, we’re going to line this up in the center
of the spring perch. I’m going to take a center punch and make
a mark. We can discard this for right now. We’ll come back to it. So, we will have to drill a hole in order
to attach our bump stop extension. I’m gonna be using a step bit in order to
drill a three-eighths inch hole. However, if you don’t have a step bit, you
will need a smaller drill bit as a pilot hole and then a three-eighths inch drill bit. So, right where we hit the spring perch with
our center punch, we can go ahead and drill a three-eighths inch hole. Now, we can put our bump stop extension on
top and grab our hardware and secure this down. So, now we can secure down our bump stop with
our provided hardware. This is going to be the Allen head bolt and
the flange nut. You’re also gonna have a tool to help you
reach underneath the spring perch to just secure that down. Then you can go ahead and tighten that up
with a 7/32nd inch Allen key. All right. After that’s tight, we can do the same thing
on the other side. So, our next step is to install our springs. However, on the driver’s side, our axle isn’t
dropping far enough down to fit a spring in that’s taller with our new extended bump stop
and our bump stop extension. So, what I’m going to do is actually disconnect
our driveshaft to drop our driver’s side axle down a little bit. So, I’m going to use a 15-millimeter swivel
socket and remove the 4 bolts that are holding the driveshaft flange. I also did make a mark on the flange on the
axle as well as the driveshaft. Just make sure it’s positioned in the correct
way when we install it. So, I did have to switch to a 15-millimeter
half-inch with a 5-inch half-inch extension just because my 3/8-inch impact gun didn’t
have enough power to take off these bolts. Now that our axle is low enough, what we can
do is install our new springs, making sure that they are set in the upper isolator, and
the pigtail is at the back of our driver’s side spring perch. All right. So, the axle is gonna roll back, and it’s
kind of gonna be offset. So, once you actually raise the axle back
up, it will set the spring in place. You just want to be mindful of that back pigtail
that it’s set in the back of this spring perch here. All right. So, that’s gonna be it for the driver’s side,
and then we can head over to the passenger side. So, now we can do the passenger side. I always put the spring underneath the drag
link. It gives me a better angle, and then we can
just wiggle it on the place. So, the pigtail of the passenger side spring
will sit at the front of the spring perch, and then on the other side, on the driver’s
side, it’s gonna sit in the back. So, just make sure that that’s seated in the
front, and then we can raise up our axle so we can get ready to put in our new shocks. So, now we can install our shock. Now, there is gonna be a tab that’s going
to go in this hole on the shock perch here, and there is gonna be a little notch on there
that is going to set itself on top of our shock body. We’re also going to get the other side of
the cup washer and the bushing, so make sure you have that in hand. What we can do is go behind our brake lines
here. Probably a little bit easier to set the tab
in this, go up through. So, I have the bottom of the shock sitting
in the bottom shock mount for a little bit of support. Now, I would recommend to lower this down
just because there’s not gonna be a lot of room up here, and we need to squeeze this
bushing and cup washer up on top of that stud. If you’re gonna have to go behind the inner
fender liner, you may have to move this around in order to squeeze that in there and make
sure that it’s sitting correctly on top of the stud, everything is seated correctly. Then we can take our nylon lock nut and thread
that on to the top stud. So, once that’s threaded on to the top of
the shock stud, what we can do is take a 19-millimeter wrench and tighten that down. Now, we don’t need to technically hold the
shock body still. It is gonna have a little wiggle room, but
that tab is just going to keep it in place. So, before we go ahead and mount up the bottom
of our shock, we do have to set our anchor for our brake lines. So, I’m gonna take a pair of snips, and on
the ABS line, I’m just gonna cut off these two clips. Be mindful of the ABS line when you’re doing
this. So, once that’s gone, we can take the factory
bolt, put that through the lower shock mount. Hook on our anchor, making sure that it’s
sticking up, and then we thread on our nut. We’ll tighten this down after we secure down
our brake lines. We’re just going to put that in place for
now. And then we’re gonna take our ABS line, and
we’re going to wedge that down to the bottom of our anchor. We’ll take our soft line, put that at the
top. So, once those are both set in the anchor,
we can take the three zip ties provided by TeraFlex, put them in the channels, two on
the outside, one in the middle, and tighten those down. After those are tightened down to the anchor,
what we can do is take that same pair of snips and just trim them up. All right. Now, we can tighten down our bolt using our
18-millimeter socket and wrench. All right. Now, we can repeat that same process on the
other side. So, since the driver’s side is a little bit
easier to access since there’s not a battery box over here, I’m gonna use a 19-millimeter
ratcheting wrench. So, our next step is to install our sway bar
end links. Now, we are going to start up at the top. I’m going to place a stud in our sway bar,
grab our washer and our nylon lock nut. Then the after that lock nut is threaded on,
what I’m gonna do is use a 6-millimeter Allen socket and a 19-millimeter wrench, and we’re
gonna tighten down this nylon lock nut onto our stud on our sway bar end link, Right? So, we can do the same thing on the other
side, and then we can go ahead and attach the bottom once both sway bar end links are
on our sway bar. So, now we can attach our pin at the bottom
of our sway bar end link mount. Now, if you’re not going to attach the quick
disconnect hardware, you will have to press a metal sleeve into the bottom of your sway
bar end link and then bolt it up as normal with the factory hardware, but we’re attaching
these sway bar end link quick-disconnect hardware. So, I’m going to put that pin on there, grab
our washer as well as our nylon lock nut just like we have on the stud, and we’re gonna
thread that into place. Now, in order to tighten this down, you will
need a screwdriver. I recommend the Phillips head screwdriver. We’re gonna have to stick it through the hole
in the pin and then grab a 19-millimeter socket and ratchet, and then we can go ahead and
tighten that down. So, when it is getting to the point where
it’s gonna be completely tightened down, you want to make sure that this pinhole is accessible,
so once you are ready to install your sway bar end link, it’s very easy to put on that
pin. So, usually just like this is fine, and then
we can do the same thing on the other side. But what it’s basically gonna happen is when
we pull this down, we’ll be able to flip this. I’m doing over. We’re gonna do the same thing that we just
did on the passenger side over on the driver’s side, making sure that our pins are facing
in. So, what we can do now is attach our sway
bar end link to our pin. I’m going to pull down on the sway bar. I did put a thin layer of grease on here just
to help the sway bar end link slip on. So, once the sway bar link is on, what we
can do is put on our large washer and then take our pin and attach it down. Now, once you press the pin on, it should
sit over the other pin that’s attached to our mountain here. And once you’re on the trail and want to disconnect
your sway bar, all you have to do is pull that pin and store them on what we’re going
to do next. So, let’s do the other side and then head
to our next step. So, before we go ahead and install our storage
mount, what we’re gonna do is put it together. So, we have a pin with four holes, and this
is where we can store our sway bar end links once they are taken off of the axle mounts. So, this just threads into that bracket, and
then what we can do is put the nut on the other side. This is going to be that low profile nut. Then we can take the screwdriver that we were
using before, stick that through, and a 14-millimeter wrench, and we can just snug that up before
we go ahead and attach it to our body mount. So, now we can head over to the Jeep and attach
that to our body mount. So, the front body mount is where we’re going
to be attaching our storage bracket. So, I’m going to be using an 18-millimeter
socket and an extension to clear our sway bar here, and we’re going to remove that nut
on the bottom of that body mount. So, what we can do next is take our mount,
sandwich that in between our bracket and our nut here. Thread the nut back on, and then we can tighten
that down with the same 18-millimeter socket and extension. So, the last thing that we have to do with
our sway bar end links is just detach our Zerk fitting. You’re going to get a small Zerk fitting for
each of your sway bar end links, and we’re going to insert that at the bottom. Thread that in, and then we can just tighten
that down with an 8-millimeter wrench. And then once that’s tightened into those
sway bar end link, you have to grease these in order to keep them operable for a long
time. Then we’re just gonna do the same thing on
the other side. So, the last big step in the front is to install
our new adjustable track bar by TeraFlex. Now, this is going to be a huge upgrade from
your factory track bar. As you can tell, it is a lot beefier. It’s gonna be 230% stronger than the factory
track bar, so you can rely on this while you’re on the trail to hold up on the trail and be
able to take a hit of a new trail. So, when you lift your Wrangler, essentially
what you’re doing is shortening the track bar link, so it’s going to throw off the axle
and where it’s positioned underneath your Wrangler. So, you want to make sure that it’s centered
underneath your Wrangler, and that’s exactly what the track bar is responsible for doing. And so, because this is adjustable, this is
going to allow us to make sure that our axle is centered underneath our Wrangler. And what we’re going to do is measure that
out from eye to eye. Thirty-three inches is a great starting point
for measuring out an adjustable track bar for any lift. And then, after that, we can go ahead and
measure each side from the chassis to the tire and make sure that it’s even making sure
that our axle is centered underneath our Jeep. So I have a tape measure here. We’re gonna go ahead and measure out what
it is already, and then we’re gonna loosen up this collar. It’s adjustable collar, just like on your
steering linkage, and we can make sure that it’s our correct length for our starting point. So, you want to make sure that you’re measuring
the track bar eye to eye, and right now, it looks like we’re at about 32 inches. So, we’re gonna loosen up this collar. I’m gonna be using a 15-millimeter socket
and my impact wrench. Great. So, you can actually feel once you loosen
up that collar. It looks like it’s at 33, so what we can do
is readjust these collars and tighten those down, and then we can go ahead and install
this on our Wrangler. So, what we can do now is install our track
bar. I did loosen up the clamp that’s closest to
our frame bracket just so we can move this back and forth and orient it in the correct
way in our bracket. Now, that’s not going to really mess with
our lengths at all, but you want to make sure you have the factory bolt in hand. We can line this up, put the factory bolt
through. Once that’s there, what we can do is grab
the nut on the back, and because this is a standard bushing, it’s not a Heim joint, we
do want to tighten it down while it’s on the ground. We don’t want to tear the bushing. We’re going to snug that up. So, also with keeping this clamp a little
bit loose, it’s going to help us put it in the frame side bracket, but what it’s also
gonna do is help us orient this in the correct way where we can adjust it in the future. So, I made sure that the bolt side is facing
up so we can squeeze an impact wrench in there, and then these are accessible down the bottom
for a wrench if they do start spinning. So, what I’m going to do is just snug these
up real with an 18-millimeter wrench and 15-millimeter socket, same thing for the other clamp, and
then we’ll be able to measure later and tell if we need to adjust this. But for right now we can move to the back. So, after we’ve connected our track bar, we
do have to fully connect it to the axle side once the Jeep is on the ground. So, what we can do now is head to the back
and support our axle, and we’re gonna start by removing our rear shock. So, I have an 18-millimeter socket and wrench,
and we can start with that lower shock bolt. So, once we removed that lower bolt, we’re
going to head up to the two upper bolts on our bar pin. So, I’m using a 16-millimeter swivel socket
and a 15-inch extension as well as my impact removal tool and make sure on the second bolt
that you be mindful of the shock will be fully disconnected. So, just be mindful that it doesn’t fall on
you. So, now we can go ahead and disconnect the
bottom bolt on our sway bar using an 18-millimeter socket and wrench. So, after the lower bolt is taken out, we
can move up to the top stud. It’s gonna be the same thing as the front,
so we’re gonna use a 19-millimeter wrench to hold the B stud still and then we can take
an 18-millimeter socket and take that nut off of this stud here. Now, what we can do next is disconnect the
axle side of our track bar using a 21-millimeter socket. So, now we can focus on our brake line brackets. First, we’re going to take off the bracket
that’s holding our e-brake cables. So, I’m gonna be using a 10-millimeter deep
socket and my impact wrench to take off the two nuts that are on the body mounted studs. So, after you’ve disconnected the bracket,
what we have to do is take our e-brake lines out of the bracket. So, we’re just gonna have to loop them out. So now we can disconnect our soft line brake
line bracket from our frame here with a 10-millimeter socket. So now, with the trim removal tool, we can
our AVS line and disconnect that from the frame just so it has a little bit of extra
slack when we drop the axle. I’m also gonna pull one of the pins from the
axle. Now, we’re gonna go ahead and lower axle down. The one last thing that I want to do is just
pull this breather hose off of the axle, so we’re not stressing it out. We can just let it hang there, and then we
can lower down our axle so we can get our springs out. So, our last thing to take off is our factory
bump stop. So, we’re gonna do the same thing that we
did in the front. I sprayed them with a little bit of PB B’laster
to help them come out. But I’m also gonna take a flat head screwdriver
and try to wedge into that tab and kind of pry them out at the same time. So, our next step is to install our bump stop
cups. Now, it is gonna be tapered, and you want
to make sure that where it’s labeled front is facing the front of our Wrangler. Now, there’s gonna be a little lip on the
inside of here, and this has to go around our bump stop cup on our frame. So, what I’m gonna do is take a couple of
blocks of wood and press this in because it will take a little bit of pressure. So, I have a bunch of blocks of wood here,
and then I’m just gonna raise up the axle, and it should press on to the factory bump
stop cup. So, after we have our bump stop cup in place,
what we need to do is press in our bump stop. So, we’re going to do the same thing. I put a little bit of grease on the edge of
our bump stop, and we’re just going to raise up our axle and press it into place. And I have a couple of blocks of wood here. All right. So, once you hear it click into place. We’re going to just do the same thing on the
other side. So, our next step is to install our bump stop
pad. Now, because we have changed the position
and size of our bump stop, it will need a little bit of extra space. So, making sure that that part with the extra
space, the offset side is facing the front of the Jeep, we can align this up on our factory
bump stop pad and install this through the factory holes with our provided hardware. So, I have our Allen head bolt and our nylon
lock nut. We can thread that on, and we can do the same
thing for the back here as well. So, what we can do now is take a half-inch
wrench, put that on the nut side and then take a 3/16-inch Allen key. I’m gonna use an Allen socket and tighten
down that bolt. We can do the same thing for the back. So, our next step with our factory isolator
is to install our spring. So, once you have the spring into place over
the spring perch, what you want to do is just raise up the axle to make sure that the spring
is stationary. So, once both springs are in, what we can
do is just raise up the axle a little bit and make sure that they’re sitting in place. So then after our springs are in and compressed
a little bit, what we can do is add our spring retainer clips. So, we have an upper and lower spring retainer. We’re gonna start with the lower one. So, this is just gonna be a large flat washer. We’re gonna put that over the spring perch. We are provided with a bolt, so we’re gonna
put that through. So, once we have the bolt through on the spring
perch, you are provided a tool and a flange as well as the lock washer, and we’re going
to go behind the axles since we don’t have a lot of room to get underneath from the front
and we’ll secure that on the back of this bolt here. So now that that’s threaded into the nut on
the other side, we can tighten up that bolt with a 9/16th-inch socket. And then we can do the same thing on the other
side. So, a little trick for this. I put a little bit of superglue on here just
to make sure that these would stay just because you are gonna have to put that at a pretty
hard angle to get it underneath here, and you have [inaudible]. So, what we’re going to do now is install
our upper retainer clips, so this is gonna go on the top of our coil. You have a flat washer and then also bolt,
and then you’re gonna have a self-locking nut. So, what we’re gonna do is there is gonna
be a factory hole on the frame side of the coil bucket up here, so what we’re gonna do
is stick that bolt through that, go on top of the coil bucket and secure that down with
that nut. Now, this is gonna be difficult to see as
well as difficult to reach. So, once we get that threaded in, what we
can do is tighten it down there. You’re gonna need a 19-millimeter socket and
a 19-millimeter wrench. So, our next step is to install our rear track
bar relocation bracket. But it does attach to our lower control arm
bolt. So, what we’re gonna do is take out the driver’s
side control arm bolt on the axle side using a 3/16th-inch box wrench and a 21-millimeter
socket. So, next, we can take our rear track or relocation
bracket with the long vent tab on the side where we just took out the control arm bolt. We can slide this over the factory mounting
bracket. So, after we’ve attached our bracket down
on our control arm, what we can do next is take our provided sleeve, put that into the
factory mount, line that up with either side. Take our new provided bolt with our provided
flat washer, put that through to the other side. Take our provided flat washer and crush nut
and put that on the other side. We can thread that on and tighten that down
in just a second. So now we can take our U-bolt, hook that around
the back of our axle here. Put that through the holes in the bracket. Take our flat washers, thread those on, and
then take our provided nuts for the U-bolt and then thread those on as well. Now, the last thing that we’re gonna do before
we tighten anything down is just attach our track bar. Now, this should line up with the top hole. However, if you can’t get it lined up with
the top hole here, then we can go ahead and put it on the ground and then wiggle the back
end of the Jeep and get that bolt in, then we take our factory bolt and our flag nut
and we’ll be able to tighten that down. So now we can tighten down the bolt on our
factory location with a 19-millimeter wrench and socket, and then we can also tighten down
the U-bolt. Now, we want to make sure that we tighten
down the actual track bar and the control arm mount while the Jeep is on the ground
on its own weight to make sure that we’re not carrying the bushing. So now we can tighten down our U-bolt with
the same 19-millimeter deep socket. So, what we can do now is attach our brake
line drop bracket. Now, this is not going to be side specific. There’s a notch on either side for our factory
hard line. So, this top tab is going to attach onto the
frame with our factory bolt in the factory location. We’re gonna thread that into place. Then you might have to bend the hardline. Just be careful when you do this. And that will make it sit in that bracket
and line up that hole there. Then we can take the provided hardware. It’s gonna be two flat washers, a bolt, and
a nylon lock nut. We can send that through our factory brake
line bracket through our drop bracket, and then we can tighten that down. So, we can tighten that down with an 11-millimeter
socket and wrench. And last but not least, we can tighten up
our top bolt with a 10-millimeter socket. So, what we can do now is attach our sway
bar end links. Now, this is gonna be the same process as
the front. We’re gonna send that stud through our sway
bar, attach our nylon lock nut. Take our 6-millimeter Allen key and a 19-millimeter
wrench, and we can tighten that down. So, what we can do now is attach the bottom
with our factory bolt, and we can tighten it down with an 18-millimeter socket and wrench. So, our next step is to install our shocks. However, we do have to bore out this hole
on our lower shock mount. So, we need to make sure that it is by five-eighths
of an inch because we are relocating the shock to the outside of this mount. So, I’m gonna take a step bit and my drill
and my safety glasses and drill this out to five-eighths of an inch. So, what we need to do now is take our pin
where we’re relocating our shock, making sure that the center side is going through our
shock mount. So, we can take our sleeve, put that inside
the shock mouth, put our pin through, [inaudible] our flat washer, and our nylon lock nut. So, what we can do now is position our shock
up with the factory bar pin location and slide this on to our pin. So, after we have our shock mounted up to
our pin here, what we can do is put on our flat washer and our nylon lock nut, and we
can tighten this side down as well as the other side of our pin. So, I’m gonna use a 19-millimeter ratcheting
wrench and a 6-millimeter Allen socket to hold the pin still. And then, after the bottom is secure, what
we can do is secure at the top. So now we can take the factory bolts and bolt
them down into that factory location. Now, on this new shock, you are gonna have
an open part of the bar pin and then a closed part of the bar pin. After those are both threaded in, what we
can do is tighten that down with the 16-millimeter swivel socket. And I’m gonna be using that 15-inch extension. Now we can repeat that process on the other
side. So, our last and final step before we put
our Wrangler on the ground and tighten everything up and torque everything down is to install
our exhaust base area. So now, if you have a 3.6L V6 like this one,
you will have to install these exhaust spacers. They are recommended over two and a half inches
of lift because after that two and a half inches of lift, the driveshaft comes in contact
with the exhaust and can wear down the boot over time, damaging it and damaging the drive
shaft. So, what we have to do is remove the two bolts
on either exhaust flange, which is very difficult. So, because of the exhaust heating up and
cooling down, it makes the bolts on the flanges very brittle, and it makes them basically
deteriorate, so it is very difficult to get them out. Now, they are very common to break. As you can tell, I’ve already broken one. I put the ratchet in the socket on one and
took one turn, and it already broke. So, in that case, what I’m gonna do is actually
take an air hammer and punch out the other side. So what we can…put a nut and a washer on
the other side of our exhaust flange instead of treading into the Walden nut that is on
our exhaust flange. So, what I’m gonna try to do is get the rest
of the bolts out. I did soak them in PB B’laster. I do recommend that you do that before you
even start the lift kit. But we’re gonna go ahead and see how it goes. So, as you can tell, these are very deteriorated. Some that I have seen are in pretty good shape
where you can remove this bolt, but there are no threads left on this. So, I’m gonna use a 16th-inch socket and a
3-8s-inch drive ratchet and try to wedge that onto the bolt head. All right. So, if your bolts are in pretty good condition,
what you can probably do is use heat. But as you can tell, ours have snapped. Actually, all four of ours have snapped. So I just turned the flange here, and I’m
going to hit this out with an air hammer. These are pressed in, so they’re not actually
welded nuts. On the back of here, these are pressed into
the flange, so we should be able to separate that bolt here or that nut here from the flange. So, one came out. Now, we need to flip the flange. So now we can punch out the two on the other
side. So, what I’m gonna do for clearance to separate
the exhaust is just loosen up this cross member here. So, I have an 18-millimeter swivel socket
and my impact wrench as well as the small extension, and we’re just gonna loosen up
these bolts. So, it also might be helpful to disconnect
the muffler from the hangers in the back just because it’s gonna give you some more slack. But having somebody pry on the exhaust, you
can lift up and kind of fit the spacer in, and once you release that, it should fit back
into the frames there. But before we go ahead and move to the other
side, what I’m gonna do is take our provided bolts and washers and also a nut and a flat
washer that I outsource to secure this down, and we’re going to go ahead and install that. Make sure our other side stays together. So, once that’s attached, then we can move
to the other side and install our longer passenger side exhaust spacer. So, before we go ahead and move to the passenger
side exhaust spacer, you might want to put the muffler back into its rear hangers just
because it’s gonna make it more difficult if you don’t. Now, what we can do is pull down on the exhaust
and put in our longer spacer on the passenger side and kind of reposition it so that spacer
is sitting on the flange correctly. So, after all the bolts are attached on your
flanges, what we can do now is tighten this down with a 13-millimeter socket and a 13-millimeter
wrench if you had to put a nut on the backside of both. So, this side is a little bit harder to reach,
so I’m going to use a 13-millimeter open-ended and box wrench and a 13-millimeter ratcheting
wrench. So, after we have our exhaust spacers in,
what we want to do is reconnect our drive shaft. Now, you will need blue Loctite to make sure
that those are secured in there correctly. I’m just gonna add a little bit of blue Loctite
to each of our driveshaft bolts. So, after all your bolts are threaded in,
what we can do is take our 15-millimeter socket and our extension that we used to take out
those bolts and tighten those down. Last but not least, we can reinstall our cross
member. So, I’m gonna start with this back bolt using
an 18-millimeter socket. Then we can move to the side bolts using an
18-millimeter swivel. Now, we can install the tires on and put the
Jeep down on the ground. So, that’s gonna wrap it up for my review
and install. Make sure you like and subscribe. And for more products and videos like this,
always keep it right here at extremeterrain.com.

2 thoughts on “Jeep Wrangler JK 2-Door Teraflex 2.5 in. Sport S/T2 Lift Kit w/ Falcon 2.1 Shocks Review & Install

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